Anti-Genocide 2.0

Originally posted at Stop Genocide.

Sometimes, it’s easy to forget the horrific realities of genocide.  While there is no way those of us who haven’t experienced it firsthand can truly begin to understand, many creative groups have found ways to help us get a little closer, from the comfort of our computers.

Video and YouTube: 24 Hours for Darfur

Harnessing the power of online video, 24 Hours for Darfur helps concerned citizens understand the situation and transmit their concerns to political leaders.

Learn about the situation from expert videos. Watch testimony from Darfurians. View appeals from people around the world. Record a message for your representatives right in your browser, or upload a video file. And email any video message directly to world leaders.

Facebook: Save Darfur Coalition’s “Be A Voice for Darfur” campaign

An incredibly easy way to send an important message asking President Obama to make Darfur a priority.  Also, you can utilize your social capital to encourage your friends to sign by having the cause post to your newsfeed, update your status, or invite your friends to join.

Twitter:

iAct is tweeting the stories of refugees from Darfur, including Zaineb, Mansur, Adef, & Nagma.


Organizations & Institutions: Save Darfur, Our Pledge, Refugees International, UNHCR, & Oxfam, Facing History, Holocaust Museum


News: UN Dispatch & Nicholas Kristof

Creative ways to take action: Darfur Guerrilla & Darfur Actions

(You should also follow Michelle & Change.org)

Videogame: Darfur is Dying. This three year old (and controversial) game won an mtvU contest in 2006, and puts “people in the shoes of a Darfurian refugee”.

And, of course, there’s what you’re reading right now: the Stop Genocide & Humanitarian Relief blogs on Change.org: some of the best places to get regular, insightful updates on genocide alerts, the situation in Darfur, and the history of the issue.

Advertisements

About Martha Heinemann Bixby

Advocacy. Politics. Life. Martha Heinemann Bixby.
This entry was posted in Advocacy, International and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s